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Tuesday, December 8, 2015

The Flood From a Child's Viewpoint (concluded)


Another stern command came from above, and Raibo said later he thought for sure Noah and his sons were going to plunge into the crowd and break up the fight, but just then Jakal yanked Shabo to his feet and dragged him away. Raibo didn’t dare follow, he was sure Shaba would be dead anyway.

Several weeks went by and Shaba slowly mended but made sure he never, ever came near the village where he grew up again. He would rather be torn by the claws and jaws of a lion than face another adult human. Raibo eventually found him, because he wanted to, then he went away and brought back three or four youngsters who were in just as dire circumstances as themselves.  The children hid out in the jungle but close to the Ark so that they could glimpse and hear Noah’s earnest pleading.
One day everything changed. The children stared transfixed as not one pair but two, they more and more animals filed out of the nearby woods and distant plains and up the ramp in a most orderly fashion. The children, forgetting their fear, rushed out to get a closer look at this strange phenomenon. The whole crowd grew silent, and the news must have been spread by runners because soon the surrounding hillsides were swelling with the marveling throng.
As the animals came the sky grew dark and there was the occasional flash of lightning and loud clap of thunder and Shaba saw many look nervously at the sky, but the threatened rain didn’t come.
Soon the animals had all filed in and Noah started to speak once again.  All around him men and women were muttering then beginning to disperse. Shaba lifted his arms in longing. Please, please, let me come, he begged, but Noah didn’t hear him because a burly giant next to him knocked him over and kept him down with his foot.
The giant eventually walked away and Shaba sat up, and rubbed the dirt out of his eyes. His companions had all snuck back to the safety of the undergrowth and before Shaba’s tired eyes he saw the doors slowly shut.
Shaba hung around with his friends the next few days but they were all strangely silent. 
If they were terrified of the earthquakes that repeatedly shook the earth they didn’t mention it. More and more innocent young children who had been brutally treated somehow found their way to them. Shaba became their unspoken leader.
“Shaba, I am so scared,” Kenzy murmured.
Eight year old Shaba brushed the hair from the little girl’s eyes.
“We all are, Kenzy,” he replied.
“I’m afraid he was right,” Loto whispered.
“Who was?”
“Noah.”
Shaba nodded.
“And we’re all going to drown.”
Shaba put his hand on the little lad’s trembling shoulder.
“Ya I know we will.”
“Aren’t you scared?”
“A little.” The earth trembled beneath their feet and they hung on to each other for support.
“But I’ve listened carefully to Preacher Noah for many days and I think I understand what he was saying,”
Right then the unnatural stench from a non-wood fire reached their nostrils. Terrified, the youngsters clung to Raibo and Shaba.
“They making more and more sacrifices to appease their gods,” a newcomer announced soberly. “There was five thrown into the fire last night.”
So they believed Noah, Shaba thought, but didn’t want to admit it.
“What was Noah trying to tell them?” the newcomer asked a moment later.
Shaba took a deep breath and looked at the sky. He reached out his hand as the first raindrop fell. 
“That the earth would be washed clean of all wickedness,” He looked at each child in turn. “You know what wickedness is. “ They shuddered and stared into each-others frightened eyes.
The rain fell faster. “Shall we go to higher ground?”  Raibo asked.
Shabo hesitated then shook his head. “The bad guys will be there, and some of them will be meaner than ever,”
“What shall we do?” Kenzy wailed.
“We will pray,” Shaba decided, “To Noah’s God.

They did, and then Shaba told them that God was preparing a happy place for all the little children: a place where they would have plenty of food and playtime with no reason to ever fear again.

For some reason they became intrigued by how much water was gushing over the waterfalls and walked over to see it. All around people were yelling, screaming and pushing their way to higher ground, but the seven little children watched the cascade with rain gushing all around them.  When the ground gave away beneath their feet they were swept away to Heaven’s gate.